Author Archive

4th of July and your pets – KEEPing THEM SAFE

Some pets do not tolerate loud noises well, and with the upcoming Fourth of July holiday and its fireworks and rowdy celebrators, your pet may be on edge. Above all, make sure your pet cannot escape the safety of your home. On the chance your pet could escape, ensure your pet is wearing a collar and ID tag and have your pet microchipped, so if found, he or she can be easily identified as yours. Scared and frantic pets may run for blocks before realizing they are lost, so the importance of identification can’t be stressed enough.

What can you do to soothe your scared pet?

Make them comfortable in a room (DO NOT TAKE THEM TO PUBLIC EVENTS)…make sure they have plenty of water and food and turn the radio on. Not blasting but moderate noise. The bass can help flush out the big BOOMS that scare them when the fireworks sounds off.

VetriScience created Composure Chews, which contain vitamin B1, colostrum calming complex, and L-theanine with other tasty ingredients that your dog will take as a treat.

Bach Rescue Remedy contains rock rose, clematis, cherry plum, and star of bethlehem to help soothe and calm frayed nerves and provide a sense of security.

A Thundershirt is a compression garment that helps your pet feel safe. A lot of pets respond positively to just this shirt!

You can also provide your pet with a safe hiding spot to retreat to, a crate or box with blankets, a favorite closet, just knowing where in your home your pet feels safest and providing easy access to this spot during stressful times can help!

Talk to your vet about which remedy or combination might be best for your pet, and have a safe and happy holiday!  Think it out what is BEST for your pet!

Blue and Kona

Never leave a Pet in a warm/hot car

Dogs and Cats need lots of water in the summer. Be smart about your pets when the summer temperatures rise.
Animals can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in just 15 minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and by sweating through their paw pads.

If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license plate number. Have the owner paged in the nearest buildings, or call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog. Don’t leave the scene until the situation has been resolved.

If the authorities are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back up your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal from the car, and then wait for authorities to arrive.

Watch for heatstroke symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, thick saliva, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and lack of coordination. If a dog shows any of these symptoms, get him or her out of the heat, preferably into an air-conditioned vehicle, and then to a veterinarian immediately. If you are unable to transport the dog yourself, take him or her into an air-conditioned building if possible and call animal control: Tell them it is an emergency.

Did you know there is a law in place in California to NOT LEAVE YOUR DOG unattended in a hot car?

Did you know? Its a law!

Read about it. Educate yourself and your family and friends. If you see this, do what you can to get the dog or pet out of that vehicle.

Call 911,  open the car and get the  animal immediate help.

two wet dogs

Cleaning your Cat or Dog’s Ears

Good Hygiene is important. If your dog has repeated head shaking, please tend to his or her ears.

They may have Foul-smelling in the ear. or waxy build-up? Red, painfully inflamed ears? What do all these things have in common? All are symptoms of otitis externa, or what is commonly referred to as ear infections. If you have ever groaned inwardly and felt dismay the moment your dog starts shaking his head or rubbing his ears along the nearest available surface, you’re not alone. Unfortunately, too many pet parents are more than familiar with this recurring medical problem. Often, it is accompanied by an offensive odor and one can only imagine how overwhelming the smell is to the suffering pup!

Canine ear infections result from an overgrowth of yeast or bacteria in the ear canal, causing redness, irritation and a heavy accumulation of wax. Likely triggers of these maladies are skin reactions to inhaled allergens – like pollen, mold or dust mites – or food allergies and sensitivities. Be aware that both large ears and swimming predispose dogs to ear infections.

Pets usually develop ear infections as adults, and the infection is almost always localized in the external portion of the ear. In most cases, the application of prescription drops or ointments directly into the ear canal usually resolves the illness. If you suspect your companion animal may be suffering from an ear infection, please seek veterinarian assistance for diagnosis and treatment. If necessary, your vet may prescribe a topical medicine and advise routine cleaning.

Check out our ear care formula

Cleans ears and eliminates odor.
Dissolves ear wax.
Removes dirt and debris.
Soothes like only aloe vera can.
Contains no alcohol and will not sting.
Leaves ears dry, which keeps nasty ear debris at bay.
Safe and gentle enough for puppies and kittens.

Ear Care Formula contains a special botanical blend and gentle cleansers specifically developed to keep your pet’s ear’s healthyIngredients: Water, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice (Aloe Vera), Hydrastis Canadensis (Goldenseal) Root Extract, Valeriana Officinalis Extract (Valerian), Juglans Nigra (Black Walnut) Leaf Extract, Hypericum Perforatum Extract (St. John’s Wort), Stellaria Media Extract (Chickweed), Glycyrrhiza Glabra Extract (Licorice Root), Scutellaria Lateriflora Extract (Skullcap), Glycolic Acid, Lactic Acid, Eucalyptus Globulus (Eucalyptus) Oil, Polysorbate 20, Sodium Benzoate, Gluconolactone.

Source- Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah reveals the steps to safe and effective ear cleaning to promote overall ear health.

Important Simple tips for your Pet in the summer

two wet dogs

​REMINDER FOR
all pet owners to keep the summer months fun and safe for all family members including pets. Families should practice a few simple tips to keep their pets healthy and safe during the summer heat:

1. Adjust their exercise routine. Walk dogs early in the morning or late in day when temperatures are cooler. Shorten walks if necessary, and avoid runs on hot days – dogs will keep running even if they are overheating. Cats tend to restrict their own activity in the heat better than dogs.

2. Remove clothing from pets. Sweaters and other clothing on pets during the summer will trap excessive heat and may contribute to overheating. The ideal temperature for cats and dogs is between 60-80 degrees. Dogs and cats cool themselves by panting and do not have sweat glands on their skin (only on their paw pads). Cats do not pant under normal circumstances – if your cat is panting, he/she may be extremely overheated or stressed and immediate action should be taken.

3. Be cautious when walking your dog on pavement and at the beach. The hot pavement and sand can burn and blister your dog’s paws, just as it would your own. If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your dog. Asphalt temperatures can reach 160 degrees. Keep dogs on lawns, or have them wear booties if they will be on asphalt or on sand.

4. Make sure your pet has plenty of access to shade and clean water when outdoors.

5. ***Never leave your pet unsupervised in a car. A hot car is never ok…even in the shade!  The temperature inside a parked car can reach 200 degrees and higher within a matter of minutes, even with the windows open. Please contact Police and/or break the car window if the pet is panting and looks distressed.

6. Make arrangements for pet care if you will be out of town. Ensure the care of your pet by providing proper nutrition, appropriate care and a secure environment.    Microchip and tags are essential.

7. Make sure your pet wears proper identification. Licensing and microchipping pets greatly increases the chances of reuniting a lost pet with its owner. Pets have a much better chance on making it back home to it’s family.

8. If you hike with your pet or for any reason…Know the Warning Signs Symptoms of overheating. Includes excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, weakness, or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.

9. Make sure you know the number of the emergency veterinary hospitals in your area. Take a few minutes to drive by your local emergency veterinary hospital so you can be sure you can find it an emergency when you may not be thinking as clearly as on an ordinary day.

Be a Responsible Pet owner! Thank you!

Feeding your Cat a healthy diet

Do you want to feed your cat a healthy diet?

Take a look at this list of things to do and what to avoid.

Be a responsible pet parent. Cats (and dogs) require a very different diet than humans to be healthy.

1. Avoid Feeding Too Much. Obesity is associated with diabetes, arthritis, urinary tract disease, and even “metabolic syndrome,” which is where factors increase the risk for developing disease. Keep your cat at a healthy weight it is for their own good. Toxicities or deficiencies can be created if the cat’s diet is too heavy in tuna, liver, cod liver oil, or raw fish.

2. Feed Wet and Dry Food. Dry food is associated with urinary tract disease and obesity. Cats are designed to get their water with their food. Here is a healthy thought to keep in mind for your cat- Mice (a cat’s normal food) are about 70% water, and canned food about 78%, while dry food is only between 5%-10% water.

3. Too Little Water. Cats should have several sources of clean fresh water available all day long. Make sure they get plenty of it. This is why some wet food combined with dry (daily) can be a healthy choice to give your feline.

4. Garlic and Onions. If given a high of dose, garlic and onions can destroy a cat’s red blood cells. May want to be safe and avoid all together?

5. Avoid Creating Nutrient Deficiencies. It is vital to balance the meat with the correct amounts of calcium and phosphorous when making your own cat food. In the wild, a cat would be eating both the meat and bones of their prey.

6. Carnivores, Vegetarian or Vegan. Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they must eat mainly meat and animal organs to thrive. Lack of taurine (found only in animal tissue It is essential for cardiovascular function, and development and function of skeletal muscle, the retina and the central nervous system) can lead to heart problems, blindness, and even death.

7. Remember to spay or neuter your cat no later than 6 mos if you can. This helps to keep the population DOWN.

****Be a responsible pet parent.  Thank you!

Creature Comfort Holistic Veterinary Center
2501 MacArthur Blvd.
Oakland, CA 94602
(510) 530-1373
creaturecomfortholistic@gmail.com
www.creaturecomfort.com

BT and girls IMG_1474

source: article by Dr. Christie Johnson @ Creature Comfort and Myself

Flea Medication reaction with our Family Dog

This is from my sister. She telephoned me in the 3rd week of March 2014 to tell me about this incident about a flea medication and her adored dog. BUCKY

“Two evenings ago, I applied one tube of K9 Advantix II for small dogs (4-10 lbs), to my 6 yr. old Maltese.  This was not the first time I had applied the product, however, within approximately 24 hrs, my dog began scratching and showing signs of  agitation.  He ran around the house and hid under furniture to get away from what was bothering him. I checked him thoroughly for fleas, ticks or mosquitoes and found nothing.  Nor was his skin irritated.  The behavior increased into night and early morning.

Thinking that he might have had an allergic reaction to the grass, as he has had in the past two years at this time of the year, I gave him a third of a tablet of Benadryl, which seemed to calm him down.  I bathed him carefully with a soothing dog shampoo, and checked once again for fleas.  Nothing.  Still concerned, I called the medical emergency number (800-422-9874) on the product box.  After providing the contact person with information about the situation, I was told that what my dog was experiencing was “paresthesia”, which could be compared to the feeling a human has when their foot or leg falls asleep.  It’s annoying and aggravating to the dog because they don’t understand it, and more importantly not dangerous – just a sensation .

The product goes to the dermis layer of the skin, and will resolve itself within 72 hrs.   However, one of the things they recommended was to shampoo the dog 3 times with Dawn Dish Soap to reduce the absorption in the skin.

The ingredient that is the source of this sensation is Permethrin, which is derived from chrysanthemums.  Furthermore, any ingredient ending in “thrin” could react the same way.  (people-read your labels). The reaction could occur even though the animal has had this product applied in the past without any symptoms.  I told them I had given my dog Benadryl, and was told that would be good to calm the dog down, but it would not help relieve the dog of the symptoms.  I found the medical emergency contact to be very knowledgeable and helpful.  We can wait it out now with relief.

Searching the Internet I have found a blog called World Wide Woof. Of course one needs to use their smarts and wonder how much can be dramatized or sensationalized. Check it out: http://www.dogsonly.org/Woof/toast.asp?sub=show&action=posts&fid=2&tid=29&page=7

Too many incidents of this poison being applied to our pets. It is dangerous! I have become very concerned and want people to know my experience to possibly help others out there avoid this mishap. The product I applied was K9Advantix II.  Please be mindful and aware of how your dog reacts if you choose to use this flea product. In the past I have used Advantage II.  Two different product ingredients, but both made by Bayer.  Now I know that I can use Advantage II on Bucky in the future, but NOT Advantix II. 

I wrote to, Bayer, the manufacturer of this product.

She wrote:

My Maltese has been in a state of frenzy
ever since applying K9 Advantix II last Sunday night. He is
biting at himself, rolling, scratching himself and the
ground, paranoid, hiding, scared, running everywhere and
anywhere,hyper.  It’s like he’s schizophrenic, crazy. I have
discussed this issue with the emergency medical contact
(referred to on your box) and was told that he is suffering
with paresthesia, a sensation in the skin from an ingredient
you now use in your product – Permethrin.  You need to take
it out of your product – it’s a poison and has done an
immense amount of harm to dogs , including death.  My claim
#1350*** has been registered with the medical emergency
number, and I will register another complaint with the Food
and Drug Division of the US Gov’t., as it is insanity that
you continue to produce this product with all the complaints
you have received.  Even the manager of the Petco that I
spoke to was all to familiar with the reaction your product
has had on animals.

Bayer responded:
Thank you for your email to the global headquarters for Bayer HealthCare Animal
Health. We appreciate you taking the time to contact us. Bayer HealthCare Animal Health, Global Communications Team,  Managing Director: Dr. Dirk Ehle

Then we spoke a few days later….

I had a 15-minute phone conversation with a representative from Bayer.  She called me to go thru EVERYTHING, documenting Bucky’s history, reaction, current condition, etc.   I was impressed with her too, as I was with the initial emergency medical contact.  She was a plethora of information, especially about the ingredient.  The only new information is to apply liquid Vitamin B to the area.  She thanked me for contacting the medical person, as they do extension reporting and follow thru with any customer complaint and with the FDA and all like agencies they have to report and work with.  I really feel confident that it will not do any permanent harm.

I am wondering this (which was not mentioned) if  ”The ingredient that is the source of this sensation is Permethrin” and harmful to ‘some dogs’…is this a chemical that affects the flea but not poisoning the dog? How can that chemical be safe? My inquiry (which I am not sure a Big Business would admit) is how can a poison affect one thing and not another?  I have a hard time believing this is safe for the over all health of the dog.    But the fleas NEED TO BE managed. So what do we do?

safe solutions:

You can go to our banner for CEDAR OIL INDUSTRIES. It’s safe -Nature’s Defender.  Look over on the right area of this blog, see the girl holding the black and white dog? Click on it.  I use it, and one of our friend’s uses it with her cat.   I spray it on the bedding and the pet.  It works for us.

AND….

I contacted my friend, Melissa, at Wylder’s Retail and Rescue in Studio City.
They offer some Holistic Flea solutions.
she wrote: “We have at WyldersHolisticPetCenter.com. We will ship these to you as well.  If anyone has questions please call Melissa at 818-762-2665 or email wyldersholisticpetcenter@gmail.com (copy and Paste)

Flea Free is a blend of organic essential oils that you spray on your dog once a day when they will be encountering fleas.  It has a lovely aroma and the $18 bottle will last around 6 months for a small to medium sized dog. The ingredients are all safe and natural. You can even spray the formula on your own hands and rub it in!

Snook’s nutritional flea treatment is a supplement that you sprinkle on your dogs food. It is all natural and has been tested on humans. The dogs do not taste it but it causes a reaction that makes their blood unappealing to fleas.  Again, it is all natural and a small 6-month supply is an affordable $15. A large is $22 and would be a 6-month supply for multiple small dogs or a large dog.

BUCKY

source: my sister, Melissa and myself.

Amazing dog

Valentine day gift idea-PERSONALIZED

Having a great deal from PERSONALIZATION on ideas for Valentine’s day. Some of the proceeds will go to MYPETFIRST for helping to place rescues in new loving homes.

<a href="http://click.linksynergy.com/fs-bin/click?id=90KhM4DPxcA&offerid=61945.10000523&type=3&subid=0” >NEW Valentine’s Day Gifts! Check out the latest additions to our personalized Romantic gifts collection<IMG border=0 width=1 height=1 src="http://ad.linksynergy.com/fs-bin/show?id=90KhM4DPxcA&bids=61945.10000523&type=3&subid=0” >

Pet’s ID-How does a MICROCHIP work

MICROCHIP your pet. How does a MICROCHIP work?

This form of permanent ID can help your lost pet find it’s way home. They will thank you!
A microchip is a small implanted frequency device (RFID) about the size of a grain of rice. It is injected under the skin between pet’s shoulders. It is similar to getting a vaccination, no anesthesia is required. It is claimed that it is not a painful procedure…maybe like a sting. The MC is completely inert lacks a power source. To read the information on the microchip, a scanner that emits specific radio frequencies is passed over the pet. This ID number is then entered into a database where the pet owner’s information is stored. This is why it is VERY IMPORTANT to keep your information updated. Be a responsible pet parent, they depend on you.

Microchipping your pet is beneficial. One success story, a lost pet was taken to a veterinarian, they scanned it and the pet actually belonged to one of the vet’s other clients. They came and retrieved their pet who snuck out under the fence. I recently heard of a dog that was returned after 7 years of being gone! The owners were thrilled to get their pet back after showing up in a shelter.
Collars and name tags are important as well, but they can come off and Microchipping is double insurance in retrieving your lost pet.

After you have your pet Microchipped make sure you register the information properly. The information in the database associated with that number consists ONLY if provided by the owner. Again, register it and keep it up to date. Please be a responsible pet owner. Do it BEFORE you have to learn the hard/heartbreaking way.

Do you have a story you can share with us? see the area, below, to reply to this entry about Microchipping…tell us your story, it can help to educate others.

I am Microchipped

I am Microchipped, see my yellow tag? that is the external number about the ID that is in the internal chip.

source: myself, Barbara Tapella, and Dr. Jeff Rothstein, president of progressive pet animal hospitals in Michigan

Lost or found a dog?

What to do…Check Animal Shelters  
Be certain to check with every animal shelter or humane society in your vicinity daily, or at least every two or three days. Click here for a list of some of the local shelters. You must go in person, as it is very difficult for busy shelter personnel to identify your pet by phone. Take the extra time to visit each shelter to avoid an unfortunate oversight. Stray dogs picked up by animal control are often misidentified as the wrong breed, wrong age, or even the wrong sex. Check every department of the shelter, including the hospital room, holding area, or quarantine area. Don’t think that because your pet is purebred that he or she was stolen. The shelters are full of purebred animals of all ages waiting for their owners to pick them up!

Check the Shelter Websites
Many of the animal shelters now maintain their own websites, posting photos and information about the dogs at their facility. Click here for a list of some of the local shelters and their website addresses. While these can be useful, don’t rely solely on the shelter websites — not every dog in the shelter gets his or her photo and information posted! In some cases, by the time a dog is posted to the website, his or her time at the shelter is almost up!

Keep Checking the Shelters
Continue to check shelters for weeks after your pet has disappeared in case it has been temporarily taken in by someone. Even if your dog was wearing an I.D. tag or microchip, go to the shelter and look for yourself! We’ve seen dogs wearing collars and I.D. tags waiting at shelters for their owners to pick them up. If you have moved or changed your phone number, the shelter may have no way to get in contact with you.

Check with Neighbors
Someone may have taken your pet in with good intentions, especially if it was not wearing I.D. Take a photo of your pet door-to-door, covering several blocks around the area that it was last seen. Be sure to also check with neighborhood kids. If you found a dog, put them on a leash and walk around the neighborhood you found them in. Do this several times. Ask neighbors…”do you know this dog? I found it and I am trying to find it’s home”.

Check Local Parks and Schools
Stray pets are often attracted to areas where there are trash cans filled with discarded food and plenty of water to drink. Check locations near where the pet was lost that might be sources of an easy meal.

Post Notices
Type or print a bold poster containing your pet’s photo, so that it’s easily and quickly legible to passing motorists. Including a photo greatly increases your chance of recovery. Post copies of your poster at local veterinary offices, pet supply stores, animal shelters, groomers, grocery stores, busy intersections, etc. and throughout your neighborhood in highly visible places.

Call Lost & Found Services
In addition to your local animal shelters, some services and organizations take calls regarding lost and found pets, and can assist in recovery. Try these resources:

www.doggiedetective.com
www.missingpet.net
www.missingpets.com
www.lostpaws.com
www.lostandfoundpet.com
www.sherlockbones.com
www.pets.lostandfound.com
www.k9alert.com
www.lostpet.com
www.PetSearchAndRescue.com
Call (888) 85FOUND
Call (714) 978-PETS

Place “Lost Dog” Ads in Local Papers
Some publications will run free “lost pet” ads for a few days. If not free, the cost is usually minimal, and well worth increasing the chances of recovering your pet.

Check “Found Dog” Ads
Check “found pet” ads in newspapers daily. Call any ad that remotely resembles the description of your pet, since the people placing the ad might not describe your pet accurately.

Don’t Assume Your Pet was Stolen!
Occasionally, we hear reports of puppies or toy-breed dogs having been stolen from their owners, but it is very uncommon for a large-breed dog such as a German Shepherd to be taken by a stranger. Often, owners assume that the reason their dog is suddenly missing from their yard could only mean that someone entered the premises and took the animal. In every one of these cases, we have found later that the dog either jumped the fence or escaped the yard in some other manner. In one case, the dog had gotten under the house and became trapped. Don’t assume that someone has taken your dog!

Don’t Give Up!
Depending on the circumstances under which your pet was lost, and where it has ended up, it could take several weeks, even months, for your reunion. For your pet’s sake as well as your own, never stop looking. When you do locate your pet, RUN — don’t walk — to the nearest pet supply store and get an I.D. tag on his or her collar IMMEDIATELY. An I.D. tag is the best way to help your pet to find his or her way safely back home. MICROCHIP!!!!!!!

Thank you!!!!! All the four legged creatures who need our voices! Baby Kona

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