Archive for the ‘volunteer with an animal shelter’ Category

Never leave a Pet in a warm/hot car

Dogs and Cats need lots of water in the summer. Be smart about your pets when the summer temperatures rise.
Animals can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in just 15 minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and by sweating through their paw pads.

If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license plate number. Have the owner paged in the nearest buildings, or call local humane authorities or police. Have someone keep an eye on the dog. Don’t leave the scene until the situation has been resolved.

If the authorities are unresponsive or too slow and the dog’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness (or several) who will back up your assessment, take steps to remove the suffering animal from the car, and then wait for authorities to arrive.

Watch for heatstroke symptoms such as restlessness, excessive thirst, thick saliva, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite, dark tongue, rapid heartbeat, fever, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, and lack of coordination. If a dog shows any of these symptoms, get him or her out of the heat, preferably into an air-conditioned vehicle, and then to a veterinarian immediately. If you are unable to transport the dog yourself, take him or her into an air-conditioned building if possible and call animal control: Tell them it is an emergency.

Did you know there is a law in place in California to NOT LEAVE YOUR DOG unattended in a hot car?

Did you know? Its a law!

Read about it. Educate yourself and your family and friends. If you see this, do what you can to get the dog or pet out of that vehicle.

Call 911,  open the car and get the  animal immediate help.

two wet dogs

Flea Medication reaction with our Family Dog

This is from my sister. She telephoned me in the 3rd week of March 2014 to tell me about this incident about a flea medication and her adored dog. BUCKY

“Two evenings ago, I applied one tube of K9 Advantix II for small dogs (4-10 lbs), to my 6 yr. old Maltese.  This was not the first time I had applied the product, however, within approximately 24 hrs, my dog began scratching and showing signs of  agitation.  He ran around the house and hid under furniture to get away from what was bothering him. I checked him thoroughly for fleas, ticks or mosquitoes and found nothing.  Nor was his skin irritated.  The behavior increased into night and early morning.

Thinking that he might have had an allergic reaction to the grass, as he has had in the past two years at this time of the year, I gave him a third of a tablet of Benadryl, which seemed to calm him down.  I bathed him carefully with a soothing dog shampoo, and checked once again for fleas.  Nothing.  Still concerned, I called the medical emergency number (800-422-9874) on the product box.  After providing the contact person with information about the situation, I was told that what my dog was experiencing was “paresthesia”, which could be compared to the feeling a human has when their foot or leg falls asleep.  It’s annoying and aggravating to the dog because they don’t understand it, and more importantly not dangerous – just a sensation .

The product goes to the dermis layer of the skin, and will resolve itself within 72 hrs.   However, one of the things they recommended was to shampoo the dog 3 times with Dawn Dish Soap to reduce the absorption in the skin.

The ingredient that is the source of this sensation is Permethrin, which is derived from chrysanthemums.  Furthermore, any ingredient ending in “thrin” could react the same way.  (people-read your labels). The reaction could occur even though the animal has had this product applied in the past without any symptoms.  I told them I had given my dog Benadryl, and was told that would be good to calm the dog down, but it would not help relieve the dog of the symptoms.  I found the medical emergency contact to be very knowledgeable and helpful.  We can wait it out now with relief.

Searching the Internet I have found a blog called World Wide Woof. Of course one needs to use their smarts and wonder how much can be dramatized or sensationalized. Check it out: http://www.dogsonly.org/Woof/toast.asp?sub=show&action=posts&fid=2&tid=29&page=7

Too many incidents of this poison being applied to our pets. It is dangerous! I have become very concerned and want people to know my experience to possibly help others out there avoid this mishap. The product I applied was K9Advantix II.  Please be mindful and aware of how your dog reacts if you choose to use this flea product. In the past I have used Advantage II.  Two different product ingredients, but both made by Bayer.  Now I know that I can use Advantage II on Bucky in the future, but NOT Advantix II. 

I wrote to, Bayer, the manufacturer of this product.

She wrote:

My Maltese has been in a state of frenzy
ever since applying K9 Advantix II last Sunday night. He is
biting at himself, rolling, scratching himself and the
ground, paranoid, hiding, scared, running everywhere and
anywhere,hyper.  It’s like he’s schizophrenic, crazy. I have
discussed this issue with the emergency medical contact
(referred to on your box) and was told that he is suffering
with paresthesia, a sensation in the skin from an ingredient
you now use in your product – Permethrin.  You need to take
it out of your product – it’s a poison and has done an
immense amount of harm to dogs , including death.  My claim
#1350*** has been registered with the medical emergency
number, and I will register another complaint with the Food
and Drug Division of the US Gov’t., as it is insanity that
you continue to produce this product with all the complaints
you have received.  Even the manager of the Petco that I
spoke to was all to familiar with the reaction your product
has had on animals.

Bayer responded:
Thank you for your email to the global headquarters for Bayer HealthCare Animal
Health. We appreciate you taking the time to contact us. Bayer HealthCare Animal Health, Global Communications Team,  Managing Director: Dr. Dirk Ehle

Then we spoke a few days later….

I had a 15-minute phone conversation with a representative from Bayer.  She called me to go thru EVERYTHING, documenting Bucky’s history, reaction, current condition, etc.   I was impressed with her too, as I was with the initial emergency medical contact.  She was a plethora of information, especially about the ingredient.  The only new information is to apply liquid Vitamin B to the area.  She thanked me for contacting the medical person, as they do extension reporting and follow thru with any customer complaint and with the FDA and all like agencies they have to report and work with.  I really feel confident that it will not do any permanent harm.

I am wondering this (which was not mentioned) if  ”The ingredient that is the source of this sensation is Permethrin” and harmful to ‘some dogs’…is this a chemical that affects the flea but not poisoning the dog? How can that chemical be safe? My inquiry (which I am not sure a Big Business would admit) is how can a poison affect one thing and not another?  I have a hard time believing this is safe for the over all health of the dog.    But the fleas NEED TO BE managed. So what do we do?

safe solutions:

You can go to our banner for CEDAR OIL INDUSTRIES. It’s safe -Nature’s Defender.  Look over on the right area of this blog, see the girl holding the black and white dog? Click on it.  I use it, and one of our friend’s uses it with her cat.   I spray it on the bedding and the pet.  It works for us.

AND….

I contacted my friend, Melissa, at Wylder’s Retail and Rescue in Studio City.
They offer some Holistic Flea solutions.
she wrote: “We have at WyldersHolisticPetCenter.com. We will ship these to you as well.  If anyone has questions please call Melissa at 818-762-2665 or email wyldersholisticpetcenter@gmail.com (copy and Paste)

Flea Free is a blend of organic essential oils that you spray on your dog once a day when they will be encountering fleas.  It has a lovely aroma and the $18 bottle will last around 6 months for a small to medium sized dog. The ingredients are all safe and natural. You can even spray the formula on your own hands and rub it in!

Snook’s nutritional flea treatment is a supplement that you sprinkle on your dogs food. It is all natural and has been tested on humans. The dogs do not taste it but it causes a reaction that makes their blood unappealing to fleas.  Again, it is all natural and a small 6-month supply is an affordable $15. A large is $22 and would be a 6-month supply for multiple small dogs or a large dog.

BUCKY

source: my sister, Melissa and myself.

Pet’s ID-How does a MICROCHIP work

MICROCHIP your pet. How does a MICROCHIP work?

This form of permanent ID can help your lost pet find it’s way home. They will thank you!
A microchip is a small implanted frequency device (RFID) about the size of a grain of rice. It is injected under the skin between pet’s shoulders. It is similar to getting a vaccination, no anesthesia is required. It is claimed that it is not a painful procedure…maybe like a sting. The MC is completely inert lacks a power source. To read the information on the microchip, a scanner that emits specific radio frequencies is passed over the pet. This ID number is then entered into a database where the pet owner’s information is stored. This is why it is VERY IMPORTANT to keep your information updated. Be a responsible pet parent, they depend on you.

Microchipping your pet is beneficial. One success story, a lost pet was taken to a veterinarian, they scanned it and the pet actually belonged to one of the vet’s other clients. They came and retrieved their pet who snuck out under the fence. I recently heard of a dog that was returned after 7 years of being gone! The owners were thrilled to get their pet back after showing up in a shelter.
Collars and name tags are important as well, but they can come off and Microchipping is double insurance in retrieving your lost pet.

After you have your pet Microchipped make sure you register the information properly. The information in the database associated with that number consists ONLY if provided by the owner. Again, register it and keep it up to date. Please be a responsible pet owner. Do it BEFORE you have to learn the hard/heartbreaking way.

Do you have a story you can share with us? see the area, below, to reply to this entry about Microchipping…tell us your story, it can help to educate others.

I am Microchipped

I am Microchipped, see my yellow tag? that is the external number about the ID that is in the internal chip.

source: myself, Barbara Tapella, and Dr. Jeff Rothstein, president of progressive pet animal hospitals in Michigan

Lost or found a dog?

What to do…Check Animal Shelters  
Be certain to check with every animal shelter or humane society in your vicinity daily, or at least every two or three days. Click here for a list of some of the local shelters. You must go in person, as it is very difficult for busy shelter personnel to identify your pet by phone. Take the extra time to visit each shelter to avoid an unfortunate oversight. Stray dogs picked up by animal control are often misidentified as the wrong breed, wrong age, or even the wrong sex. Check every department of the shelter, including the hospital room, holding area, or quarantine area. Don’t think that because your pet is purebred that he or she was stolen. The shelters are full of purebred animals of all ages waiting for their owners to pick them up!

Check the Shelter Websites
Many of the animal shelters now maintain their own websites, posting photos and information about the dogs at their facility. Click here for a list of some of the local shelters and their website addresses. While these can be useful, don’t rely solely on the shelter websites — not every dog in the shelter gets his or her photo and information posted! In some cases, by the time a dog is posted to the website, his or her time at the shelter is almost up!

Keep Checking the Shelters
Continue to check shelters for weeks after your pet has disappeared in case it has been temporarily taken in by someone. Even if your dog was wearing an I.D. tag or microchip, go to the shelter and look for yourself! We’ve seen dogs wearing collars and I.D. tags waiting at shelters for their owners to pick them up. If you have moved or changed your phone number, the shelter may have no way to get in contact with you.

Check with Neighbors
Someone may have taken your pet in with good intentions, especially if it was not wearing I.D. Take a photo of your pet door-to-door, covering several blocks around the area that it was last seen. Be sure to also check with neighborhood kids. If you found a dog, put them on a leash and walk around the neighborhood you found them in. Do this several times. Ask neighbors…”do you know this dog? I found it and I am trying to find it’s home”.

Check Local Parks and Schools
Stray pets are often attracted to areas where there are trash cans filled with discarded food and plenty of water to drink. Check locations near where the pet was lost that might be sources of an easy meal.

Post Notices
Type or print a bold poster containing your pet’s photo, so that it’s easily and quickly legible to passing motorists. Including a photo greatly increases your chance of recovery. Post copies of your poster at local veterinary offices, pet supply stores, animal shelters, groomers, grocery stores, busy intersections, etc. and throughout your neighborhood in highly visible places.

Call Lost & Found Services
In addition to your local animal shelters, some services and organizations take calls regarding lost and found pets, and can assist in recovery. Try these resources:

www.doggiedetective.com
www.missingpet.net
www.missingpets.com
www.lostpaws.com
www.lostandfoundpet.com
www.sherlockbones.com
www.pets.lostandfound.com
www.k9alert.com
www.lostpet.com
www.PetSearchAndRescue.com
Call (888) 85FOUND
Call (714) 978-PETS

Place “Lost Dog” Ads in Local Papers
Some publications will run free “lost pet” ads for a few days. If not free, the cost is usually minimal, and well worth increasing the chances of recovering your pet.

Check “Found Dog” Ads
Check “found pet” ads in newspapers daily. Call any ad that remotely resembles the description of your pet, since the people placing the ad might not describe your pet accurately.

Don’t Assume Your Pet was Stolen!
Occasionally, we hear reports of puppies or toy-breed dogs having been stolen from their owners, but it is very uncommon for a large-breed dog such as a German Shepherd to be taken by a stranger. Often, owners assume that the reason their dog is suddenly missing from their yard could only mean that someone entered the premises and took the animal. In every one of these cases, we have found later that the dog either jumped the fence or escaped the yard in some other manner. In one case, the dog had gotten under the house and became trapped. Don’t assume that someone has taken your dog!

Don’t Give Up!
Depending on the circumstances under which your pet was lost, and where it has ended up, it could take several weeks, even months, for your reunion. For your pet’s sake as well as your own, never stop looking. When you do locate your pet, RUN — don’t walk — to the nearest pet supply store and get an I.D. tag on his or her collar IMMEDIATELY. An I.D. tag is the best way to help your pet to find his or her way safely back home. MICROCHIP!!!!!!!

Thank you!!!!! All the four legged creatures who need our voices! Baby Kona

I love connecting People with Pets…doing it from my heart

    We found a special couple to open their hearts and give another dog a home!  Yay! How good does this feel?   You know what I mean if you have ever found an animal in need.  You feel all that tension and anxiety, and ask “why did I get involved with this?”.  Then you stick with it, you get support and the magic starts to unfold, ending in a blessed act of kindness!  Another Happy Animal who is safe.

Your hope is raised and you are happy you got involved. You kick up your heels and feel like you contributed.

  The Internet is amazing, so powerful and reaches many miles and makes the limits much wider.  I often think about all the dogs, cats, pets that used to rely on the local classified ads in newspapers.  If you were lucky enough a person telephoned. “in the old days”….

I love doing this work for the animals- It takes time and tenacity.

Want to share this-My regular income is generated with my massage practice and has been since 1984.   In 2010, I created www.mypetfirst.com to educate, network and build community for the animals.   It helps to bring income & keep my heart projects alive. Please consider stopping by and looking at the Pet food I represent, or click google ads below, or buy from my affiliates, and/or order stuff through my link at Amazon (for anything you buy).   We all will benefit!

The pet food, supplements & treats I represent at Life’s Abundance is a human grade pet food that gets delivered right to your doorstep…on a schedule that you control.  The Holistic Vet that formulates it, Dr. Jane, donates, quarterly, to animal rescue groups. The benefits keep on coming!

Watch these short informative videos on the quality of our Pet food at Life’s Abundance. we explain why it’s premium pet food.  I would love it if you placed and order. It helps to generate some income for all the time and energy I (unconditionally) give everyday.

Please go to my site and check it out:

www.mypetfirst.com
Thank you! Barbara Tapella

This is Barbara and Moki. She found Barbara & was adopted when she was 7 years old and lived a blessed life until she was 16.

   

This dog can’t stay awake…ever feel like this?

This is so CUTE!!!!

Winter and your pets

Winter will soon wrap her cold, sleety arms around much of the country. We want to remind everybody to take special precautions to keep their fur kids safe and healthy. Veterinarian, Dr. Sarah, devotes time to the crucial topic of cold-weather safety.

Be it Winter or Spring or any other season…. EMBRACE the responsibility of a new companion animal.  Make sure you are educated to best serve your new family member. It’s a FOREVER COMMITMENT.

Dr. Sarah has some seriously helpful tips for all  new and established pet parents alike. It’s our (Life’s Abundance) version of the best-of-the-best info for winter pet care, with a dash of old-school puppy safety thrown in for good measure. Hopefully, this brief video will put your mind at ease, demonstrating just how simple it is to keep wee pups, and old dogs, safe throughout the chilly winter.

Stray dog, Faith

Claudia Hoffmann writes:    My friend Eldad Hagar and his wife Audrey Spilker Hagar do such an amazing job helping stray animals. The videos bring awareness of what’s really out there. More abandoned and stray dogs than a lot of people dare to imagine.
You can pick up CAR LOADS of stray animals daily in LA and surrounding areas! PLEASE spay/neuter and micro chip your animals!
Just look at this video! Heartwarming and a happy ending!     Faith still needs a home.  Please share and support Hope for Paws!

Have Pet? or dealing with the Grief of losing one?

  • The American Humane Association has completed phase I of a three-part study on pet ownership. The goal of the study is to help find families for more homeless pets, and to help those pets remain in their new homes forever.
  • Phase I of the study examined the reasons people don’t own a dog or cat.,what One surprising result from the survey of 1,500 previous pet owners was that 20 percent were still dealing with the grief of losing a prior pet, which prevented them from getting another four-legged companion.
  • Results from phase I indicate pet advocacy groups need to address general negative attitudes toward cats, focus cat adoption strategies on the people most open to owning a kitty, and better understand the role grief plays as a barrier to future pet ownership.

Pets are good for your well-being. Companions and helps calm your nervous system. 

resource: Dr. Becker’s Blog

Quality Pet Food for your Dog or Cat….go here and read about and click it to buy. Simple. and delivered to your door!

Poison Safety Kits for your Cat or Dog

found this today, please educate yourself:

You love your cats and dogs like they were one of the family. And chances are, you’ve got a first aid kit in some form around the house in case something should happen to one of the human members of your family. But what about the animal members?

Pet owners should create a safety kit to keep on hand for poisoning emergencies involving their animals. According to the ASPCA, this kit should contain:

• A fresh bottle of hydrogen peroxide, 3 percent solution (USP).
• Can of soft dog or cat food.
• Turkey baster, bulb syringe, or large medical syringe.
• Saline eye solution to flush out eye contaminants.
• Artificial tear gel to lubricate eyes after flushing
• Mild grease-cutting dishwashing liquid to decontaminate skin.
• Skunk Off! or tomato juice (for skunk spray).
• Rubber gloves or tough gardening gloves.
• Forceps to remove stingers.
• Muzzle (a frightened animal may inadvertently bite).
• Several soft old towels.
• Pet carrier.

If you suspect you pet has consumed something toxic, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center: (888) 426-4435. There is a $60 consultation fee for this service; experts are on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Want to do something about the threat to pets? Protect household animals from toxins by letting the FDA know that we need a new system of public health protections.

By Melissa Breyer, Senior Editor, Care2 Healthy and Green Living

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